Posted by: tazz602 | May 2, 2010

If We Build It, NO – You Cannot Come

Settlers landed. They found a land ripe with promise, teeming with animal life that could be used for food, abundance of plant life and fertile fields to feed the masses that would eventually arrive.  There was just one problem.  An indigenous people that was here first.  No problem as long as they did not get in the way.  They were primitive.

More settlers arrived, as the numbers grew so did the demand for resources from the new world.  The indigenous people were pushed back, pushed back more, slaughtered if they did not comply, pushed back even more, and more, as these new settlers took over the land, water resources, the animals for food and even treasures that had been part of the indigenous peoples heritage for generations.  All because it was their “destiny”, they were the stronger people, they deserved the land and could make full use of it.  The natives could adapt anywhere or, simply be erased from existence.

I’m not just talking about the obvious, this story could be part of the history of many modern and past nations and empires.  From the modern humans versus the Neanderthals, Jews and the Canaanites, up to the history of almost every nation on the American continent, from Canada down to Argentina.  In almost all cases the conquerors had to hold their land by fear.  They had to keep their majority numbers and above all else, push their way of life on anyone that lived within their territory.

Hence we direct our attention to Arizona.  A state that was not only part of a land mass that was populated by the Native Americans, but this swath of land in particular, when the settlers finally found it,  belonged to another nation entirely, the sovereign country of Mexico which had just wrested control from the Spanish in 1821.  The Mexican nationals that lived here were part of the indigenous people that inhabited Mexico in addition to being part Spaniard, their conquerors several hundred years before, mixed in with other races that had come over as Spanish slaves or part of the Spanish conquistadors.

The United States, in its continuous land grab went to war with Mexico and wrested control of all land north of the Gila river in 1848.  The Gadsen purchase in 1853 cemented Arizona as part of the United States. Territory status and Statehood come in 1863 and 1912.

As the conquerors, Americans had to take land by force, have an army and a centralized government big enough to keep control, and maintain order.  This is built into our psyches, this is part of not only our heritage but those of may other nations around the world.  It is the history of man, is is the order of the nature of the human being.  We were dominate therefore we deserve the land and YOU do not.

Arizona, 2010.  In a nation where “diversity” is celebrated by some, the conquerors and settlers from other states in Arizona have deep seated fears.  For years the media has been telling us that in the border states they were quickly approaching minority status.    Hispanics,  coming into the country, both legally and illegally, were quickly displacing the majority rule of the settlers and conquerors.  Never mind that their ancestors came over by boat loads, in droves, with no regard to immigration status and were welcomed with opened arms.   Since they were part of the conquerors and settlers races it was OK.  There was a time when immigration was welcome from south and central America as well as Cuba and Puerto Rico.  But there has to be a limits, right?  Now there are quotas and complex procedures to immigrate into the US and there are rising voices claiming that even that immigration is a threat and we should close our borders entirely.

What is done in any situation where the majority people in power feel threatened but outsiders that are gaining a foothold?

We pass laws under the guise of law enforcement or some other ridiculous agenda:

  1. Arizona passes a law that the government can only conduct business in English.  English Only (Voted in 1988, overturned by SCOTUS, reinstated 2006 by AZ voters again).  These laws prevent people who are not US native, whether they are here legally or not, access to government resources unless they learn the language.
  2. Attempted elimination of ESL (English as a Second Language) classes in Public Schools.  Voters approved in 2000.  Luckily due to the ambiguous language of the bill most schools were able to get waivers and continue their bilingual education programs.
  3. Voter ID Law.  In 2004 voters approved a law that required presentation of State approved ID to vote in polling places and gain government assistance.  Critics say that the law disenfranchises voters, particularly minorities and the elderly, and that requiring voters to acquire and produce identification would be burdensome in time, money and effort.
  4. Arizona passes the immigration law in 2010 which is now part of the public debates and forums.  While the law has been amended to not use race as a factor for checking immigration status, few reasonable people believe this law will not lead to racial profiling.  The issue here, that most of the supporters fail to realize is that racial profiling exists today, while illegal at a federal level, it is done.  Just ask any Black or Hispanic person living in the State.  This law unfortunately now codified the practices already being done.  It also forces law enforcement to comply, they can be sued if they don’t.
  5. Arizona in 2010 is also quietly removing teachers from classrooms if they have a heavy accent under the guise that they are poor examples to students learning English.

White Anglo Saxon Arizonan’s are scared.  Few of them realize they are here because our borders were open and allowed their ancestors in without prior authorization.  They are scared that immigrants will increase and force them to change their way of thinking by including other races, other points of view into government.  They are afraid that if there is an amnesty from the Federal government it will make thousands of Hispanics legal and upset the balance of power forever.  It’s sad, so sad.  I am embarrassed to live here once again, a feeling I thought was gone when we got rid of the joke of a governor Evan Mecham.  Oh wait, or was it the “alleged” crook, Fife Simington? Whatever.  Same Arizona, different year.

We’re here now, you can’t come in.  Don’t try or we’ll flush you out, one way or another.

Posted by: tazz602 | February 23, 2010

I’m Back – kinda . . . .

. . . . . or here for those that have never ready any of my blog entries before.

For a few years I had a blog on LiveJournal, but with my increased use of Twitter, Facebook, etc. I let it fall by the wayside.  My last post was about my uncle that passed away about a year ago.

I had more connections and a bigger audience on Twitter which has now blossomed into connections on Facebook.  Yet I still felt I needed a place that could connect with both of those sites and where I could write longer blog entries, something a little more than “micro blogging”

I will be slowly bringing over some of my LJ blog entries, some very personal about my family, some very opinionated.  I’m still trying to find my voice and I think I’m closer to finding it and a way of expressing views, telling stores, etc. that people will want to read, or at least my Twitter and Facebook family might take the time to read and comment on.  I want this to be more than just “What I did last summer” – if that is possible.

I might be using you as a sounding board as well – there is a fiction story/novel that I have let languish partly on paper and the rest in my head that needs to be finished.  It also needs some updating since I started it almost six years ago.  Times have changed a LOT in six years.

For those that don’t know me here is a short intro to me:

I am a 47 years old (real, not internet age) gay man in Phoenix.  My partner and I have been together for 15 years now.   In here I refer to him as D.  He is a very private man.

I finally accepted that I was gay when I was 26 after battling with my Christian upbringing, going back and forth, counseling, ex-gay movement bullshit, etc.  I knew that I was gay since I was 13.  I come from a large (9 siblings) and racially diverse family (Caucasian, Korean, African-American and Hispanic).  My parents divorced after I was an adult, which left my father to finish raising the two youngest boys they had adopted.  My father passed away in 2005 after an 18 month battle with lung cancer with one of my brothers and I at his side.  For a year I was the legal guardian of the youngest brother until he turned 18.

In my in-between years and after I accepted my sexual orientation,  I had a variety of, shall we say, encounters, from vanilla to kink to ???   I learned a lot about myself and about other people.  I made a few friends, I saw a lot of relationships start and end.  I watched people change, I watched people grow.  Observation and learning from your own mistakes are the keys to life and moving forward.

Well, that is enough for now.  On my Ask Me Anything page I brought over all the questions people asked me on Formspring.me – feel free to ask more and I will post the questions and answers here and on that page.

If there are any topics you’d like my opinion on, whether I’m right or wrong, or just to start a public discourse – feel free to ask me to weigh in as well.

See you all later – don’t forget to grab a cookie on the way out.

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